Camille Flammarion

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Thork

Camille Flammarion
« on: August 21, 2011, 05:40:17 AM »
Just a little interesting background information on Camille Flammarion’s 1888 book L’Atmosphère.



Quote from: http://www.futilitycloset.com/2009/05/23/special-delivery-2/
This is the Flammarion woodcut, so named because it first appeared in Camille Flammarion’s 1888 book L’Atmosphère. No one knows who created it; it’s thought to depict a medieval pilgrim who discovers the point where earth and sky meet.

Flammarion’s book itself seemed touched by magic. As the astronomer was completing a chapter on the force of the wind, a sudden gale blew the last few pages out the window and off in a whirlwind among the trees. Then a downpour started, and Flammarion gave them up as lost.

He was astonished, then, a few days later when his printer delivered the full chapter, with no pages missing.

It seems the porter who normally brought Flammarion’s proof sheets had been returning to his office when he noticed the sodden manuscript leaves on the ground. He assumed that he himself had dropped them and so had collected them and carried them to the printer without telling anyone.

“Remember,” Flammarion writes, “it was a chapter on the strange doings of the wind.”
« Last Edit: August 21, 2011, 06:12:18 AM by Thork »

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Thork

Re: Flammarion Woodcut
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2011, 05:53:01 AM »
More from Camille Flammarion



Quote from: http://www.futilitycloset.com/2007/01/21/an-airborne-doppelganger/
French astronomer Camille Flammarion writes of a curious ballooning incident in Wonders of Earth, Sea And Sky (1902):

On April 15, 1868, at about half-past three in the afternoon, we emerged from a stratum of clouds, when the shadow of the balloon was seen by us, surrounded by colored concentric circles, of which the car formed the centre. It was very plainly visible upon a yellowish white ground. A first circle of pale blue encompassed this ground and the car in a kind of ring. Around this ring was a second of a deeper yellow, then a grayish red zone, and lastly as the exterior circumference, a fourth circle, violet in hue, and imperceptibly toning down into the gray tint of the clouds. The slightest details were clearly discernible — net, robes, and instruments. Every one of our gestures was instantaneously reproduced by the aerial spectres. … It is … certain that this is a phenomenon of the diffraction of light simply produced by the vesicles of the mist.

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Thork

Re: Flammarion Woodcut
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2011, 05:59:35 AM »
More from Camille. I'm having a Flammarion day.



Quote from: http://www.futilitycloset.com/page/15/?s=earth
French astronomer Camille Flammarion writes of a curious optical phenomenon in Wonders of Earth, Sea And Sky (1902):

Ulloa, being in company with six fellow-travellers upon the Pambamarca at daybreak one morning, observed that the summit of the mountain was entirely covered with thick clouds, and that the sun, when it rose, dissipated them, leaving only in their stead light vapors, which it was almost impossible to distinguish. Suddenly, in the opposite direction to where the sun was rising, “each of the travellers beheld, at about seventy feet from where he was standing, his own image reflected in the air as in a mirror. The image was in the centre of three rainbows of different colors, and surrounded at a certain distance by a fourth bow with only one color. … All these bows were perpendicular to the horizon; they moved in the direction of, and followed, the image of the person they enveloped as with a glory.”

“The most remarkable point was that, although the seven spectators were standing in a group, each person only saw the phenomenon in regard to his own person, and was disposed to disbelieve that it was repeated in respect to his companions,” Flammarion writes. “The same apparition was observed in the polar regions by Scoresby, and described by him. He states that the phenomenon appears whenever there is mist and at the same time shining sun.”

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Thork

Re: Flammarion Woodcut
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2011, 06:10:25 AM »
A phantom city

Quote from: http://www.futilitycloset.com/2008/09/19/a-phantom-city/
In The Atmosphere (1873), Camille Flammarion quotes a M. Grellois, who was traveling in northern Algeria in the summer of 1847:

I was proceeding one very hot day on horseback, at a walking pace, between Ghelma and Bône, in company with a young friend who has since died. When we had arrived within about two leagues of Bône, toward one in the afternoon, we were suddenly brought to a halt at a turn in the road by the appearance of a marvelous picture unfolded before our eyes. To the east of Bône, upon a sandy stretch of ground which a few days before we had seen arid and bare, there rose at this moment, upon a gently sloping hill running down to the sea, a vast and beautiful city, adorned with monuments, domes, and steeples.

That sounds like a mirage, but Grellois says the travelers observed the city for nearly half an hour, and that “reason refused to admit that this was only a vision.” “Whence came this apparition? There was no resemblance to Bône, still less to La Calle or Ghelma, both distant twenty leagues at least. Are we to suppose it was the reflected image of some large city on the Sicilian coast? That seems to me very improbable.”

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Thork

Camille Flammarion
« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2011, 06:11:26 AM »
Inclement weather

Quote from: http://www.futilitycloset.com/2008/07/22/inclement-weather/
In The Atmosphere (1873), Camille Flammarion reports that in the latter part of October 1844, during a hurricane in the south of France, hailstones fell weighing 11 pounds. On May 8, 1802, a piece of ice fell “which measured more than three feet both in length and in width, with a thickness of two and a quarter feet.”

Nature (Aug. 30, 1894) reports that a gopher turtle, measuring 6 by 8 inches and entirely encased in ice, fell at Bovina, Miss., during a severe hailstorm there in 1893. Meteorologist Cleveland Abbe suggested that some “special local whirls or gusts” had carried it aloft. The turtle, evidently, had no comment.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2011, 06:18:02 AM by Thork »

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Thork

Re: Camille Flammarion
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2011, 06:46:13 AM »
I finally found a copy of Flammarion's book L’Atmosphère. But alas it is in Frog and I don't speak frog. :(

http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k408619m/f4.image

I take it back. A full English version below.
http://www.archive.org/stream/atmosphere00flamgoog#page/n18/mode/2up

Re: Camille Flammarion
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2011, 12:50:18 PM »
cool stuff - liking the art work
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