Sun & Moon

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Sun & Moon
« on: June 16, 2009, 09:14:00 AM »
In the FAQ it states that the sun and moon are both 32 miles wide and the sun emits hot light.

Firstly, how does the sun emit this hot light?
It cannot be constantly emitting energy through fusion, as a key element for fusion in the sun is gravity due to it's mass, according to RET.

Plus, what the hell is cold light? How on earth do you have cold light?

Figures please, no scepticism on the mechanics of the RE, as I'm asking for the mechanics of FET, not the flaws or mechanics of RET.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2009, 05:22:01 PM by mazty88 »

Re: Sun & Moon
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2009, 10:05:28 AM »
In the FAQ it states that the sun and moon are both 32 miles apart and the sun emits hot light.

Firstly, how does the sun emit this hot light?
It cannot be constantly emitting energy through fusion, as a key element for fusion in the sun is gravity due to it's mass, according to RET.

Plus, what the hell is cold light? How on earth do you have cold light?

Figures please, no scepticism on the mechanics of the RE, as I'm asking for the mechanics of FET, not the flaws or mechanics of RET.

Good luck in getting those answers.  They simply don't have a physical evidences or mathematical model for their theories, instead they "steal" pieces of RE theories and try to fit in the FET.


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spanner34.5

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Re: Sun & Moon
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2009, 10:08:41 AM »
In the FAQ it states that the sun and moon are both 32 miles apart and the sun emits hot light.

Firstly, how does the sun emit this hot light?
It cannot be constantly emitting energy through fusion, as a key element for fusion in the sun is gravity due to it's mass, according to RET.

Plus, what the hell is cold light? How on earth do you have cold light?

Figures please, no scepticism on the mechanics of the RE, as I'm asking for the mechanics of FET, not the flaws or mechanics of RET.
Hot light contains lots of infra-red, cold light does not.
My I.Q. is 85. Or was it 58?

Re: Sun & Moon
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2009, 10:28:09 AM »
In the FAQ it states that the sun and moon are both 32 miles apart and the sun emits hot light.

Firstly, how does the sun emit this hot light?
It cannot be constantly emitting energy through fusion, as a key element for fusion in the sun is gravity due to it's mass, according to RET.

Plus, what the hell is cold light? How on earth do you have cold light?

Figures please, no scepticism on the mechanics of the RE, as I'm asking for the mechanics of FET, not the flaws or mechanics of RET.
Hot light contains lots of infra-red, cold light does not.
...That's not how physics works.
Visible light also causes heat, you cannot have cold light. It'd be like having a freezing fire.

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Skeptek

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Re: Sun & Moon
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2009, 05:19:25 PM »
In the FAQ it states that the sun and moon are both 32 miles apart and the sun emits hot light.

Firstly, how does the sun emit this hot light?
It cannot be constantly emitting energy through fusion, as a key element for fusion in the sun is gravity due to it's mass, according to RET.

Plus, what the hell is cold light? How on earth do you have cold light?

Figures please, no scepticism on the mechanics of the RE, as I'm asking for the mechanics of FET, not the flaws or mechanics of RET.
Hot light contains lots of infra-red, cold light does not.
Where do you get this from?

There is no actual evidence FOR FER, everything they have is evidence AGAINST REF.
When do we all drink the Kool-Aid?
Enjoy my posts?  Learn more here:
Not just another Flat Earth website... All are welcome.

(Thanks, Daniel.

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grogberries

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Re: Sun & Moon
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2009, 06:37:19 PM »
In the FAQ it states that the sun and moon are both 32 miles apart and the sun emits hot light.

Firstly, how does the sun emit this hot light?
It cannot be constantly emitting energy through fusion, as a key element for fusion in the sun is gravity due to it's mass, according to RET.

Plus, what the hell is cold light? How on earth do you have cold light?

Figures please, no scepticism on the mechanics of the RE, as I'm asking for the mechanics of FET, not the flaws or mechanics of RET.
Hot light contains lots of infra-red, cold light does not.
...That's not how physics works.
Visible light also causes heat, you cannot have cold light. It'd be like having a freezing fire.

Visible light does not cause heat. Visible light interacts with matter to cause heat.
Think hard. Think Flat.

Re: Sun & Moon
« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2009, 06:41:02 PM »
In the FAQ it states that the sun and moon are both 32 miles apart and the sun emits hot light.

Firstly, how does the sun emit this hot light?
It cannot be constantly emitting energy through fusion, as a key element for fusion in the sun is gravity due to it's mass, according to RET.

Plus, what the hell is cold light? How on earth do you have cold light?

Figures please, no scepticism on the mechanics of the RE, as I'm asking for the mechanics of FET, not the flaws or mechanics of RET.
Hot light contains lots of infra-red, cold light does not.
...That's not how physics works.
Visible light also causes heat, you cannot have cold light. It'd be like having a freezing fire.

Visible light does not cause heat. Visible light interacts with matter to cause heat.
It's the same with IR, as IR is not "heat".
Light and electromagnetic waves of any frequency will heat surfaces that absorb them. Infrared light from the Sun only accounts for 49% of the heating of the Earth, with the rest being caused by visible light that is absorbed then re-radiated at longer wavelengths. Visible light or ultraviolet-emitting lasers can char paper and incandescently hot objects emit visible radiation.

Unless you can redefine how VL interacts with surfaces, you have no point, as again, there can be no such thing as "cold light".
« Last Edit: June 16, 2009, 06:42:47 PM by mazty88 »