Observing Earth's shadow

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skeptical scientist

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Observing Earth's shadow
« on: November 23, 2006, 08:41:26 PM »
The next time you watch the sunset, wait until after the sun has set, and then look towards the east. You will be able to see a dark band, as seen in this photograph:

This is the shadow cast on the sky by the curve of the earth, as compared to the higher up atmosphere which is still lit by the setting sun.

So, who wants to be the first to come up with a flat-earth explanation? :P
-David
E pur si muove!

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Dioptimus Drime

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Observing Earth's shadow
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2006, 08:51:58 PM »
Well, the "shadow of the Earth's curve" is a nice guess, but I don't think there's anything that can prove that it's actually the Earth's shadow. It could just as well be the sun reacting oddly to the rest of the sky. I mean, we see sunsets all different colors; seeing purple doesn't really prove to me that it's the Earth's shadow.

~D-Draw

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skeptical scientist

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Observing Earth's shadow
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2006, 09:03:20 PM »
Quote from: "DiegoDraw"
Well, the "shadow of the Earth's curve" is a nice guess, but I don't think there's anything that can prove that it's actually the Earth's shadow. It could just as well be the sun reacting oddly to the rest of the sky. I mean, we see sunsets all different colors; seeing purple doesn't really prove to me that it's the Earth's shadow.

~D-Draw

It's a dark band that appears on the opposite side of the sky from the sunset, and rises gradually over time. If it's not the earth's shadow, what is it?
-David
E pur si muove!

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Dioptimus Drime

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Observing Earth's shadow
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2006, 11:38:33 PM »
Quote from: "skeptical scientist"
It's a dark band that appears on the opposite side of the sky from the sunset, and rises gradually over time. If it's not the earth's shadow, what is it?

Well, the sun isn't orange nor does it have any bluish tint, or anything, but if you'd note: the day sky IS blue, and the sunset does turn orange and blue and all other spectacular colors. So, why, then, couldn't it just be another color that the setting of the sun seems to make?

~D-Draw

Observing Earth's shadow
« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2006, 05:15:41 AM »
Because its on the opposite side of the sunset.
eh, I am over it, believe in what you want.

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beast

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Observing Earth's shadow
« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2006, 08:45:55 AM »
The air is thicker as you get closer to the Earth.  Despite what the conspirators tell us, light actually travels much better through less air than more air.  Hence you can see the light from the sun which is in the thin air up top, but the light in the thick air is unable to reach us so well, so it looks darker.

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Erasmus

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Observing Earth's shadow
« Reply #6 on: November 24, 2006, 10:58:40 AM »
Well, we all admit that the sun appears to set.  This implies that it ought to appear that something is getting in between a given viewing point and the sun, which implies that that thing ought to appear shadowed.  I think you can't have one without the other.

In other words, whatever explanation FEers put forth to explain the "sunset" is also an explation for Earthshadow.
Why did the chicken cross the Möbius strip?

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Masterchef

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Observing Earth's shadow
« Reply #7 on: November 24, 2006, 11:05:27 AM »
Quote from: "beast"
The air is thicker as you get closer to the Earth.

Yes, the air is "thicker" at lower altitudes. And actually, according to Flat Earth Hypothesis, it should be getting denser as time goes on. If the Earth is truly accelerating at an ever increasing speed, the pressure at which the atmosphere is being pushed against us should increase as well.

Quote
Despite what the conspirators tell us, light actually travels much better through less air than more air.

Who has claimed it doesn't?

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skeptical scientist

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Observing Earth's shadow
« Reply #8 on: November 24, 2006, 12:36:46 PM »
Quote from: "Erasmus"
Well, we all admit that the sun appears to set.  This implies that it ought to appear that something is getting in between a given viewing point and the sun, which implies that that thing ought to appear shadowed.  I think you can't have one without the other.

In other words, whatever explanation FEers put forth to explain the "sunset" is also an explation for Earthshadow.

The only explanation I've seen is that it's a perspective effect. A perspective effect wouldn't cause sunlight to be blocked lower down but not higher up. So the one FE explanation for sunsets I've seen does NOT explain Earth's shadow. If you'd like to offer another, go ahead...
-David
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skeptical scientist

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Observing Earth's shadow
« Reply #9 on: November 24, 2006, 12:39:08 PM »
Quote from: "Masterchief2219"
Yes, the air is "thicker" at lower altitudes. And actually, according to Flat Earth Hypothesis, it should be getting denser as time goes on. If the Earth is truly accelerating at an ever increasing speed, the pressure at which the atmosphere is being pushed against us should increase as well.

Not true. If the FE hypothesis were correct, it would reach an equilibrium where the pressure gradient in the atmosphere imparts a force which is exactly enough to provide the acceleration needed to keep pace with the accelerating Earth.
-David
E pur si muove!