what is a flat earth year?

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what is a flat earth year?
« on: December 03, 2008, 10:11:16 AM »
because in the RE it's the time it takes orbit the sun (rounded up of course) just wondered what a year in FE measures.

AND

how are the other planets years measured.

thanks.

Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2008, 03:31:48 AM »
anyone?? or is this too much of an base level question so you can't blind me with pigeon physics.

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Jack

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Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2008, 04:47:43 AM »
Both calendars are the same.

Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2008, 04:50:06 AM »
Both calendars are the same.

But what does a year mean in FE? Is it so many days/orbits of the sun? Given how often FE insists RE is bunk I dont see why they should be allowed to use our calendar.

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Jack

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Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2008, 05:12:38 AM »
If the completion of one solar rotation above the FE is a day (86400 seconds), then a year in FE means the sun completing ~365 rotations.




Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2008, 06:04:31 AM »
If the completion of one solar rotation above the FE is a day (86400 seconds), then a year in FE means the sun completing ~365 rotations.


soooooooo does that mean that the sun and the moon orbit faster during winter months?

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dim

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Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2008, 06:04:52 AM »
Because we (as FET) do not accept the thing that Earth doing 1 round circle around the sun. For us, it just made up thing and far-fetched in order to correspond with RET defraud.

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len

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Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2008, 08:19:02 AM »
If the completion of one solar rotation above the FE is a day (86400 seconds), then a year in FE means the sun completing ~365 rotations.

Borrowed from my other thread.

See the following map for illustrations. I borrowed it from the FAQ.



As you can see here you have 3 types of orbit for the sun. One for the Winter Solstice, another for the equinox, and yet another for the Summer Solstice.

The Suns orbit is also concentric, meaning they share a common center point. (As stated in Earth Not a Globe, Chapter VI: THE SUN'S MOTION, CONCENTRIC WITH THE POLAR CENTRE. "The following simple experiment will be interesting as demonstrating the fact that the sun's path is concentric with the centre of the earth's surface.")

So all three orbits share the same center, which is the Polar Center.

Now looking at the diagram, it shows that the orbit is circular. Not eliptical. See image:



So that would mean, in order to maintain a 24hour rotation as Tom stated according to Earth Not a Globe:

Quote from: Tom Bishop
The sun rotates at one rotation per 24 hours. Read Earth Not a Globe.
Quote from: Tom Bishop
If you want to find the speed of the sun in mph during its Northern Annulus figure out what the circumference of the Tropic of Cancer is and divide by 24.

If you want to find its speed in its Southern Annulus figure out what the circumference of the Tropic of Capricorn is and divide by 24.

That's as far as I can help you.

The speed of the sun must speed up during it's outermost orbit to maintain a true 24 hour day. That would also mean, as the Sun's orbit neared it's polar center, it would have to slow down to maintain a true 24 hour day.

Since the circumference of the outermost orbit is longer than the circumference of the innermost orbit, it must compensate by speeding up to achieve the same 24hour goal.

So this introduces this question: What causes the increase/decrease of the Sun's speed? (If Newtonian laws apply here.)

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dim

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Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2008, 09:11:20 AM »
What I think, before asking a question what causes Sun to move faster or slower, I guess we must first compare the lenght of the light day in two "semispheres". Cuz anyway, in summer we got longer days, in winter shorter, so what is happening at the same times let's say in Australia?

Cuz I think the lenght of the light day can be an answer.


Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2008, 09:33:48 AM »
I think from the above post he is trying to say that sun must slow down the RE southern hemisphere in the northern winter and vice versa. How does it know !!!
« Last Edit: December 04, 2008, 09:38:30 AM by monkeybradders »

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dim

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Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #10 on: December 04, 2008, 11:26:33 AM »
Nah. I telling about that 24 hours it's agian, humanmade thing. Time is a humanmade thing. But sun shines different amount of time in different places, so it maybe that sun never changes it's speed.

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len

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Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #11 on: December 04, 2008, 03:45:30 PM »
Nah. I telling about that 24 hours it's agian, humanmade thing. Time is a humanmade thing. But sun shines different amount of time in different places, so it maybe that sun never changes it's speed.

Then that means the Sun has One orbit...or perhaps it's not the Sun that's orbiting the earth, it's the earth that's orbiting the Sun! OMG!!!!!!!

Regardless if it was a 1 hour day, 2 hour day, or 10,000,000 hour day...THE SUN WILL HAVE TO CHANGE IT'S SPEED DURING IT'S WINTER AND SUMMER SOLSTICES.

Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #12 on: December 06, 2008, 05:12:36 AM »
Nah. I telling about that 24 hours it's agian, humanmade thing. Time is a humanmade thing. But sun shines different amount of time in different places, so it maybe that sun never changes it's speed.
A Day is determined by the positions of the Sun. A Day is the time it takes for the Sun to appear at the same point in the sky again. We divided this up into 24 hours in Babylonian times (they had a base 60 number system :o - it is why we have 60 seconds in a minute and 60 minutes in an hour, it is also why we have 360 degrees in a circle).

Now if we use some device (or even multiple devices that use different mechanisms so as to avoid any errors due to the mechanism) to measure the time it takes for a single day (say counting the number of swings of a pendulum), we can then check to make sure that each Day is the same, as if they are the same on the device, then they must be the same.

But, the total time (eg number of swings of the pendulum) is the same regardless of the season, or you position on the Earth.

This means that the Sun must make a circle around the FE every 24 hours (as we break up the swings of the pendulum for convenience sake) regardless of your position or season.

Mathematically the Angular Velocity of the Sun is therefore 360 degrees every 24 hours (15 degrees/hour).

Now using Pi to calculate the Circumference of a circle (2 * Pi * Radius) we can see that if the radius increases the Circumference must also increase. So if the Sun is closer to the North Pole in the Northern Summer, then the circumference of that circle must be smaller than the one for the Southern Summer.

As the Sun must make this trip in the same time, and Speed is Distance divided by Time, then the Sun must be travelling faster in the Southern Summer than the Northern Summer.

Here are the Formulas (as I haven't been given the radius of the Sun in the Northern and Southern Summer times, I'll just have to stick with the formulas until I get them - or if you have them you can easily substitute them into the formulas yourself):

Southern Summer Sun Radius = R1
Northern Summer Sun Radius = R2

Speed of Sun in the Southern Summer: 2 Pi R1 / 24
Speed of Sun in the Northern Summer: 2 Pi R2 / 24

The Laws of Conservation of momentum when applied to an rotating system (like the sun in FE) state that the momentum can't just disappear without some outside cause (just as it can't be created from nothing too). This is the Law of Conservation of Angular Momentum, and is used by Ice Skaters when doing a pirouette. If they start with their arms outstretched, then pull them in, they will speed up. And, if they started with their arms in and move them outwards, they will slow down.

But the FE Sun is doign the Exact opposite!  :o

It is speeding up as it goes outwards, and slows down as it moves inwards.

So not only does FET have to account for the change in velocity to cover the same angle in the same time, they also have to account for the apparent violation of the Conservation of Angular Momentum law (which can be proved by ice skaters).
Everyday household experimentation.

Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #13 on: December 06, 2008, 10:27:07 AM »
win

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Johannes

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Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #14 on: December 08, 2008, 04:10:34 PM »
It takes force to change the radius of the suns rotation. Impulse negates the conservation of momentum's effects.

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Perfect Circle

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Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #15 on: December 08, 2008, 04:16:42 PM »
It takes force to change the radius of the suns rotation. Impulse negates the conservation of momentum's effects.
No.
Like the sun, the stars are also expanding and contracting their diameter as they spin around the hub every six months.

Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #16 on: December 08, 2008, 04:21:42 PM »
Interestingly enough, the quantity:
c/g
where c is the speed of light in vacuum, and g is the acceleration of free fall near the Earth's surface has a dimension:
[c/ g] = T-1 L/(T-2 L) = T
of time and numerical value:
(2.998 ? 108 m/s)/(9.81 m/s2) = 3.06 ? 107 s ? 1 day/(8.6400 ? 104 s) = 354 days

This is the length of a short year in the Jewish lunisolar calendar. Odd?
« Last Edit: December 08, 2008, 04:25:00 PM by John Jackson »
Your mother.

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Johannes

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Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #17 on: December 08, 2008, 04:22:39 PM »
Yes, according to experimentation the equations for impulse are correct  ::)

Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #18 on: December 09, 2008, 01:56:45 AM »
It takes force to change the radius of the suns rotation. Impulse negates the conservation of momentum's effects.
It does not negate it, it can counter act it, but the conservation law still holds. Also, this means that a force has to come from somewhere, as the Conservation of Energy Law states.

This would be an immense amount of energy. So what is the nature of this force, and where does it originate form?
Everyday household experimentation.

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Lord Wilmore

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Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #19 on: December 09, 2008, 04:49:11 AM »
because in the RE it's the time it takes orbit the sun (rounded up of course) just wondered what a year in FE measures.

I wonder what they did when they didn't know exactly how many days it took the earth to 'orbit' the sun? You know, back in that thing called the past when they had strikingly similar calanders.

And do you mean the Hebrew year, or the Islamic year? And how come the year is shorter every four years?

Oh that's right, a 'year' is an innacurate approximation of the time cycle of the seasons.
"I want truth for truth's sake, not for the applaud or approval of men. I would not reject truth because it is unpopular, nor accept error because it is popular. I should rather be right and stand alone than run with the multitude and be wrong." - C.S. DeFord

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Johannes

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Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #20 on: December 09, 2008, 02:53:14 PM »
Nitpicking on technicalities....

The force comes from dark matter, which also powers the celestial gears and the UA.

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Perfect Circle

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Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #21 on: December 09, 2008, 03:18:47 PM »
Nitpicking on technicalities....

The force comes from dark matter, which also powers the celestial gears and the UA.
Proof?
Like the sun, the stars are also expanding and contracting their diameter as they spin around the hub every six months.

Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #22 on: December 09, 2008, 05:26:46 PM »
Nitpicking on technicalities....

The force comes from dark matter, which also powers the celestial gears and the UA.
Celestial gears are disproved as they would create multiple images of certain stars in the sky.

Acceleration of the Earth is disproved because measurements made to the strength of the gravitational field varies with height and does not vary with the location of the Sun or Moon.

Besides the FE Dark Matter is an Ad Hoc explanation and is a logical fallacy, therefore it makes no logical sense to use Dark Matter until the effects that it is supposed to create are conclusively determined. As the effects that you have proposed are false (as  shown above), then they really can't provide a necessity for FE Dark Matter.

As an example: I propose a substance called Invisimatter. This makes Unicorns Invisible. As we can not see Unicorns this proves the existence of Invisimatter.  ::)

Get it.
Everyday household experimentation.

Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #23 on: December 11, 2008, 03:56:35 AM »


Now i'm not scientist but I have done a small experiment trying to recreate northern hemisphere summer (southern winter) using a simple torch and a simple table. When I have held the torch close to the table and performed a tight orbit (summer) my light a very small area of the table (earth) giving short days . During my wider winter orbit my light covered more table giving more light to the earth hence longer days.

 I even tried going faster and slower but I found the only way to get a proper recreation of the northern hemisphere summer (southern winter) was to go wide for the summer and come in tight for the winter. However, this would mean the north would have long cold days during summer as the sun is further away and the south would have short hot days during the winter.

Any comments on how I can get over these glitches are greatly received.

Kind regards

Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #24 on: December 12, 2008, 02:06:48 AM »
anyone? I'm not taking the piss i'm really keen to figure this out.

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Tom Bishop

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Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #25 on: December 12, 2008, 02:19:58 AM »
Quote
I even tried going faster and slower but I found the only way to get a proper recreation of the northern hemisphere summer (southern winter) was to go wide for the summer and come in tight for the winter. However, this would mean the north would have long cold days during summer as the sun is further away and the south would have short hot days during the winter.

The days are long in the summer and short in the winter.

Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #26 on: December 12, 2008, 02:36:44 AM »

Now i'm not scientist but I have done a small experiment trying to recreate northern hemisphere summer (southern winter) using a simple torch and a simple table. When I have held the torch close to the table and performed a tight orbit (summer) my light a very small area of the table (earth) giving short days . During my wider winter orbit my light covered more table giving more light to the earth hence longer days.

 I even tried going faster and slower but I found the only way to get a proper recreation of the northern hemisphere summer (southern winter) was to go wide for the summer and come in tight for the winter. However, this would mean the north would have long cold days during summer as the sun is further away and the south would have short hot days during the winter.

Any comments on how I can get over these glitches are greatly received.

Kind regards

yes they are however as i'm sure you've noted they are not cold in summer and hot in winter.

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Tom Bishop

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Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #27 on: December 12, 2008, 02:43:27 AM »
If the rays are more spread out in the winter there aren't any more rays. The existing rays are just more spread out.

When the light of the sun is coming in at an angle it is naturally colder because the light has to spread out over more surface area.



When sunlight shines from overhead (on left), one square foot of sunlight falls on one square foot of ground. When it shines at a shallow angle (on right), each square foot of sunlight spreads out over many feet of ground. That's why winter sunlight is colder than summer sunlight.

Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #28 on: December 12, 2008, 04:59:12 AM »
If the rays are more spread out in the winter there aren't any more rays. The existing rays are just more spread out.

When the light of the sun is coming in at an angle it is naturally colder because the light has to spread out over more surface area.



When sunlight shines from overhead (on left), one square foot of sunlight falls on one square foot of ground. When it shines at a shallow angle (on right), each square foot of sunlight spreads out over many feet of ground. That's why winter sunlight is colder than summer sunlight.

So the has to sun adjust this angle as it moves around earth in order that Australians are all toasty warm right now yet i'm cold in England?
Is the sun on some sort of pendulum?

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Tom Bishop

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Re: what is a flat earth year?
« Reply #29 on: December 12, 2008, 01:44:00 PM »
Quote
So the has to sun adjust this angle as it moves around earth in order that Australians are all toasty warm right now yet i'm cold in England?
Is the sun on some sort of pendulum?

When the sun is over Australia it's not over England. Its rays are shining at England from an angle, as seen in the right figure of the above illustration.