The sun - Possible experiments

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Earthquakesdontbend

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Re: The sun - Possible experiments
« Reply #30 on: November 23, 2008, 11:32:49 PM »
All right, the purpose of this thread was that Flat-earthers would be able to make observations to see if the sun is actually retreating rather than disappearing below the horizon. Stay on topic please.

This applies for both the Flat- and Round-earthers.

And Tom, you cannot use the "give me more evidence" argument when you have already been granted tons, and tons of evidence. You ignore every, single, round-earth argument.
I was thinking of putting up the "top ten shapes of the earth". I've got Pyramid Earth and Cubic Earth so far...

Re: The sun - Possible experiments
« Reply #31 on: November 24, 2008, 03:23:08 AM »
Quote
http://www.daylightmap.com/
http://www.die.net/earth/hemisphere.html

http://www.die.net/earth/how.html

So the only data you guys can manage to present comes from NASA weather satellites?  ???

Only the background map comes from a NASA satellites. The daylight zones are calculated based on RE geometry.
I live in Finland and I can personally say that the daylight maps produced by that program are accurate at least where I live.
Perhaps someone else could check the validity of that map in some other part of the world so that we could produce the data that Tom requires.

Re: The sun - Possible experiments
« Reply #32 on: November 24, 2008, 03:25:12 AM »
So in other words you guys don't really have any data to demonstrate daylight times for various points across the earth and were really just working under the assumption that your model was correct?

I guess that's that then.

We have NASA images as evidence you have no evidence. Therefore it is logical to assume that earth is round unless you come with conflicting evidence or evidence that the NASA images are faked.

Re: The sun - Possible experiments
« Reply #33 on: November 24, 2008, 04:49:34 AM »
Where's the math demonstrating that those observations match up with the Round Earth model?

Since I am feeling lazy this morning, I am going to use someone else's calculations.  I went to the US Naval Observatory site on the assumption that their math is based on a round Earth.

I asked for their predictions for the 22 Sept (equinox and the day those observations ) or New Orleans Louisiana.

Here are their predictions...

Quote
    Astronomical Applications Dept.                                               
    U.S. Naval Observatory                                                       
    Washington, DC 20392-5420
                                                       
    NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA                                                       
       o  ,    o  ,                                                               
    W 90 05, N29 58
                                                                 
    Altitude and Azimuth of the Sun                                               
    Sep 22, 2008                                                                 
    Central Standard Time
                                                           
              Altitude    Azimuth                                                 
                          (E of N)
                                                   
     h  m         o           o                                                   
    05:00      -11.4        83.2
    05:10       -9.2        84.5
    05:20       -7.1        85.8
    05:30       -4.9        87.1
    05:40       -2.8        88.3
    05:50       -0.0        89.6
    06:00        1.9        90.8
    06:10        3.9        92.1
    06:20        6.0        93.4
    06:30        8.2        94.6
    06:40       10.3        95.9
    06:50       12.4        97.2
    07:00       14.6        98.5
    07:10       16.7        99.9

Compare that with the results of the observation (note there is a one hour time zone difference)...

"Sunrise Observed: 0645 ZT (1145 GMT)
Azimuth (Bearing): 089.5?"

As expected, the observed results matched the results that were predicted for RE within one degree.  Considering a difference of almost 2 degrees of latitude (120nm) those are fairly close.

Re: The sun - Possible experiments
« Reply #34 on: November 24, 2008, 04:58:15 AM »
So the only data you guys can manage to present comes from NASA weather satellites?  ???

No, but it is the easiest data to help people visualize the pattern of day vs night. 

We could post lots of tables with the sunrise and sunset times, taken from local newspaper websites that shows the data you are looking for.  Of course, then you would have to plot that on your own map, which there isn't one, to show how that pattern fits FE predictions. 

That really isn't economical in time when that is the same data used to create the posted map (minus the official FE map of course).

Re: The sun - Possible experiments
« Reply #35 on: November 24, 2008, 01:08:42 PM »
So where's the data?

Fine, you asked, you shall recieve. I don't know why I bother tbh, it's you that should be providing data.

" class="bbc_link" target="_blank">

As you can see, the sun rose at about 6am and set at about 5pm, giving a total amount of 11 hours daylight.



On this diagram, we see that, in FET, nowhere south of the equator gets more than about 6 hours daylight at equinox. In the Australian winter (when that time lapse was taken) there should be even less daylight than that.

</Tom's ridiculous cries for evidence>
</Tom's belief that people in the Southern Hemisphere subsist on a few hours of Sun a day>
</FET>
</Tom Bishop>

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Tоm Bishоp

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Re: The sun - Possible experiments
« Reply #36 on: November 24, 2008, 04:14:25 PM »
Your data means nothing, because as long as the earth is flat, the math will come out wrong.
the earth is flat, hence we can see distant lighthouses, hence the earth is flat

Re: The sun - Possible experiments
« Reply #37 on: November 25, 2008, 03:53:11 PM »
So where's the data?

Fine, you asked, you shall recieve. I don't know why I bother tbh, it's you that should be providing data.

" class="bbc_link" target="_blank">

As you can see, the sun rose at about 6am and set at about 5pm, giving a total amount of 11 hours daylight.



On this diagram, we see that, in FET, nowhere south of the equator gets more than about 6 hours daylight at equinox. In the Australian winter (when that time lapse was taken) there should be even less daylight than that.

</Tom's ridiculous cries for evidence>
</Tom's belief that people in the Southern Hemisphere subsist on a few hours of Sun a day>
</FET>
</Tom Bishop>

Tom? Anyone?